Using Photographs, Legally


Bangladeshi websites and newspapers has a nasty tendency of stealing photographs and graphics from Internet. What these ignorant people doesn’t tend to realise that it’s a serious offense, and they could be penalised for copyright and intellectual property infringement.

Leading Bengali newspaper Prothom Alo published a creative work of mine without permission and without giving any credit. That work was released under full copyright, but they didn’t bother to care. Almost all photographers in Bangladesh has a similar experience to share, where their work has been used illegally by these thieves.

I no longer release my photographs under full copyright, but under a Creative Commons license which states that you’re legally entitled to use my photographs for both your commercial and non-commercial needs; you’re entitled to modify them anyway you want to to suit yourself; and distribute them anyway you like; provided that you put my name on the credit line. You don’t have to take my permission, nor you’ve to pay me, all I want is you is to give me proper attribution.

I’d like to present you guys with one site that has used two of my photographers for their banner and in return gave me the credit:

Thanks to the developers behind this site for respecting my license. I hope fellow Bangladeshi countrymen and media would start to realise that copyright infringement not a harmless act but is a crime. The sooner this happens, the better.

iCommons iSummit 2007


This year’s iCommons iSummit was held in Dubrovnik, Croatia, on the banks of the Adriatic Sea. The summit was truly international, and it was a great experience for me to be able to meet so many people from so many different countries under one roof.


Creative Commons Version 3.0 is Born


After few months of delay, Creative Commons has finally released the Version 3.0 licenses. The key differences from Version 2.5 are:

  • Generic and the US licenses are now separated
  • International harmonisation of moral rights and collecting society
  • No more endorsement language
  • BY-SA compatibility structure is included
  • Clarifications negotiated with Debian and MIT

Congrats to everyone at Creative Commons who made this possible, especially project coordinator Mia Garlick (sad that she’s leaving CC and joining Google). Details of the changes are described here. The official press release isn’t out yet, but should be soon.

And yeah, don’t forget to Digg this news!

Creative Commons in Bangladeshi Jurisdiction


Wouldn’t it be great to have Creative Commons (CC) licenses ported in Bangladeshi jurisdiction? Yeah, it sure would be great and fantastic! And guess what, it’s my latest project now! After more than two months of correspondence with CC internationalization team, I’ve finally received the green signal to proceed.

Creative Commons

I’ll be working on porting the version 3.0 of CC licenses, which will replace the present version 2.5 licenses. Please wish me luck; it’s by far the most daring project I’ve ever got involved with!